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20131202
20131210
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a diplomatic one. or as it was described to me at the time, we want to demilitarize our foreign policy, and you had a very forward-leaning point of view as it was perceived whereas hagel was seen as of a different view. first of all, is this assessment at all accurate? and second, what's happened in the ensuing months in terms of where they have gone on policies from iran to afghanistan as we were just discussing, does that, in fact, reflect this far more diplomatic and less military aapproach? >> i, i don't have a window into the president's decision making, but i, your explanation does not ring true to me, to my ears. i think chuck hagel has been close associate of president obama's since their time in the senate. of he served on the president's intelligence advisory board. i think there was a lot of discussion in the first term about finding a place for chuck hagel in the president's cabinet, and i think that that, you know, that discussion was naturally renewed when there was an opportunity to bring new people into the cabinet in the second term. so i think that is the president's, you know
and economic assistance. other tools of former -- foreign policy. the state department budget is puny in comparison to the defense budget. you get an awful lot of benefit from some of those investments that the state department, in terms of assistance, economic assistance and it is that part of the category of the budget where we have had a lot less success in getting bipartisan support. moree senate, we have bipartisan support for that. lindsey graham, john mccain, they have been big supporters of a robust state department budget. house, some of our colleagues on the republican -- broadlyially defined as the tea party folks, it has been difficult trying to convince them of the important national security arguments in favor of that form of assistance. this is a constant back-and- forth. if you look at the house republican budget over the ten- year period, it would cut the category of the budget for those kind of state department operations. we going to have to work together to try and prevent it. if you want to do the kinds of things that mike rogers wants to do and i agree with most
a tougher stand on foreign policy issues to shore up his popularity, and the senkakku islands or the diaoyu island islands dispute is very sensitive in chine ha. leaders cannot afterward to be weak in dealing with japan or the united states. >> biden's visit is seen as tangible evidence of the u.s. pivot. it's a strategy recovering from the recent debacle at the apec meeting of regional leaders, a meeting that the u.s. president withdrew from at the last minute because of his domestic budget crisis, leaving an assertive china to fill the void. >> after president obama pulled oust his visit, it was up to biden to play catch up. ease tensions and a reminder that america is still a pacific power. >> one of the hezbollah senior leaders was killed in beirut. he was shot outside his home. the armed group says he survived several attempts on his life and a 2006 war with israel. let's join andrew simmonds, live from beirut. >> tell us about who lakis was and the circumstances of his death. >> well, the attack took place outside his home, as you said there, he was driving back from work around midni
. >> interestingly, on the political front, we know of course that the eu foreign policy chief, katherine ashton is due to arrive on tuesday. what doo does this signify? >> authorities show their strength on monday. but it is ahead of the possibility at least of further negotiation. and coincidentally, we heard the president yanukovych who, of course, these protestors want out and new elections taking place, has offered the possibility of talks. the opposition initially have said, we're not prepared to talk. when we're hemmed in by your riot police. but i think with katherine ashton's arrival, there is a possibility, at least account, that the -- at least, that the warg factions in this dispute might move towards talking to each other. that will certainly be her aim. and it's also, i think, although one can never be sure about these things, that while she is here, perhaps the authorities will not move against the protestors who are still camped out here, as we were saying, and also occupying city hall. >> they are camped out in what are freezing conditions. it's been snowing there for most of th
of the agenda at their own national security foreign policy interest. if this is good for russia, they will be at the table. that is a double edged sword. it can be a great way to solve some problems across the middle east, but we need to be extremely cautious of setting the table but so any agreement or arrangement with the russians also protects u.s., our allies interests in the region as well. the assad -- if you look at the tenets of the chemical agreement, great we got some chemical weapons off, but the russians cleaned up on us on exactly what they got in that particular field. and because of that we alienated our allies in the region. that is an important component. i am for getting that deal, but we are paying a price for that deal, but not only including the allies in negotiating that deal. >> let's consider this conversation on syria. we you were a sponsor in the summer of the free syria act, a bill to provide arms and support to the syrian rebels. when we interviewed the representative, he said he was pleased to have your co- sponsorship of the bill, a bipartisan effor
necessary for our folks. >> did you have a question? >> thank you. i am a fellow at the foreign policy institute here at sais. you mentioned one common interest the united states has with russia and syria is to prevent syria from becoming a base of operations for al qaeda. once we start changing the border regime in that part of the world, we are in for changes that will have many repercussions. my question is as follows -- do you foresee in the medium-term, scenario where we see assad staying in power as being instrumental in that we share with the russians. > i think the american position, which i support, has been that you had, in syria, at he beginning of the arab spring, a movement that represented the aspirations of the majority of the syrian people across the secretary and lines for more openness and hange. the assad regime is a brutal regime that suppresses the rights of the people. e need to change the regime in syria. the challenge has been -- from our perspective we think be syrian the people deserve a government, one that represents their aspirations. we need to make sure t
important tools of foreign-policy which as secretary gates and other secretaries of defense have made clear, the state department budget is unique in comparison with the defense budget but again an awful lot of benefit from some of those state department both in terms of assistance, economic assistance and other forms of assistance and it's that part of the category of the budget where we have had a lot less success in getting bipartisan support. although i would say in the senate we have more, much more bipartisan support so for example senator lindsey graham and senator john mccain have been very big supporters of a robust state department budget as well. but in the house certainly some of our colleagues on the public inside a specially broadly defined as the tea party folks, i mean they have got, it's been really difficult trying to convince them of the important national security arguments in favor of that assistance. but again this is a constant back-and-forth and if you look at the house republican budget over the ten-year period it dramatically dramatically, it would dramatically cut
because its proxy, hezbollah, carries out its foreign policy. his lolba has continuously attacked israel over the decades and is instrumental in fighting the coalition of syrian revolution forces. it's a rebel group which the u.s. recognizes as a legitimate representative of the syrian people. let us not forget iran's intrusion on u.s. soil. the iranian hostage try crisis of 1979 began with an attack on and subsequent occupation of the u.s. emmascy. 52 americans were held hostage for 444 days. the attack had the support of iran's then-leader, ayatollah khomeini. it was a clear violation of international diplomatic protocol. the iranian president mea several years -- claims that their nuclear program is for peaceful pump, saying iran's only desire is to diversify its energy production capabilities. yet iran has not only refused to reverse course on enriching uranium, they have developed faster.enrich uranium recently freshman members of the foreign affair committees sent a bipartisan letter to president obama telling him to be vigilant in diplomatic actions with iranis. any diplomatic dis
critic much russia's policy towards ukraine. but sergei lavrov, the russian foreign minister is here, and yesterday he condemned what he called n.a.t.o. inference into the domestic matters of the you grain. meanwhile, as you can see behind me the protest in independent square continues. there's a question, a doubt about momentum. people can carry on turning out in their thousands as they have been doing. ultimately they need a clear idea of their objectives, what they are trying to achieve and how they can achieve it. i'm not sure that they have that. that's why the ukrainian government policy may be to sit this thing out. >> barnaby phillips reports from kiev. a shift from protests on the streets of thailand. they paused demonstrations out of respect for the kings birthday. >> this was a day to fill the streets and put politics aside. tens of thousands of thais came out to see their beloved king. >> translation: i'm happy to celebrate his birthday. it makes me happy to see him. i wish he would be with us forever. >> as each year passes concern grows about the 8 six-year-old. he made
approach to foreign policy. netanyahu has said recently, rouhani has an iron fist sheathed by a velvet glove. rouhani was a nuclear negotiator, and he even bragged that he had used at the cover to advance iran's nuclear efforts. while he may be president, he is not the supreme leader, which is khamenei. the guy who at the end of the day really controls the shots is ali khamenei. rouhani was chosen by a special, very small group that khamenei had picked. they chose acceptable candidates within a narrow band of political thought. i think people do, people i work with look forward to the day when people in iran have a genuine choice between alternatives politically, but they are a long way from it. to your point, in terms of how much wiggle room rouhani has, the iranians have two big goals. >> you can watch the rest of this online at the c-span video library. we will move onto the willard hotel for remarks by secretary of state on kerry at the brookings institution save and -- brookingsisrael forum onon save anban u.s.-israel relations. >> thank you for the generous introduction and for t
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10